This map, created by John Melish (1771-1822) in 1820, shows the western boundary of Louisiana to be the Sabine River. The Neches River, claimed by speculators to be the real Sabine River, also empties into Sabine Lake, which empties into the Gulf of Mexico. The Neutral Ground, which was agreed upon after the Adams-Onís Treaty, included almost half of the two large parishes on Louisiana’s western border in this map.The smaller parishes along the Mississippi River indicate the concentration of population there. Map of Louisiana, 1820, by John Melish courtesy of the Library of Congress
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This map, created by John Melish (1771-1822) in 1820, shows the western boundary of Louisiana to be the Sabine River. The Neches River, claimed by speculators to be the real Sabine River, also empties into Sabine Lake, which empties into the Gulf of Mexico. The Neutral Ground, which was agreed upon after the Adams-Onís Treaty, included almost half of the two large parishes on Louisiana’s western border in this map.The smaller parishes along the Mississippi River indicate the concentration of population there. Map of Louisiana, 1820, by John Melish courtesy of the Library of Congress

Adams-Onis Treaty signed   

On February 22, 1819, the western boundary of Louisiana was set at the Sabine River with the signing of the Adams-Onís Treaty between Spain and the United States. However, the boundary was not ratified until three years later and continued to be disputed in the following decades. Prior to the French and Indian War (1756-1763), Louisiana, a territory encompassing all or parts of 15 present U.S. states and parts of two provinces in Canada, was claimed by France. At the end of that war, Great Britain held East and West Florida, and Spain held the Louisiana territory. At … Continue reading →

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Over 300 instructional resources are provided including high quality teacher guides, serial stories, student supplements, bullying / character education materials, numerous subject-specific resources, video & audio teacher training modules, and the popular NIE Instructional Calendar.

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School Newspaper - Grant

Grants are available for teachers to receive newspapers and e-edition subscriptions for classroom use. At this time, grants are limited to EBR, WBR, ASC, and LIV parishes.

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Newspapers may be purchased for educational use by schools at a rate of .25 per newspaper ordered.

Who cares about the seemingly insignificant?

Posted on February 13, 2015 by Molly Manson

The Baton Rouge bus boycott offers several topics for discussion or writing. Here are just a few that come to mind. If you have others, please share them in the comment section below.

Horatio Thompson was a business owner who did what he could to help the boycott effort. He sold gas at cost to those who were using their personal vehicles to give people rides. He is not remembered in the textbooks, but he played a crucial role. Can you find an example of someone who did something that mattered, but who isn't remembered by many people?

The Baton Rouge … Continue reading →

How well do people fit in?

Posted on February 13, 2015 by Molly Manson

The way the Europeans treated the Natchez was arrogant and brutal. But the Natchez society was based on a caste system that was equally arrogant and brutal.

Ultimately, the Natchez ceased to exist as a tribe because they would not give in to demands made by French officials, but instead killed all of the French settlers who occupied their lands. This resulted in their annihilation.

Here are some prompts for writing and research activities that relate to how different groups relate to one another.

Have your students find instances in the newspaper of a group of people who are – … Continue reading →

Contacts

Molly Manson mmanson@theadvocate.com Editor of the Louisiana Page
225-388-0224

Julia Forbes jforbes@theadvocate.com Newspapers in Education
225-388-0659

Evelyn Huckaby ehuckaby@theadvocate.com Newspapers In Education
225-388-0228