At the bus station in Durham, N.C., photo by Jack Delano, 1940, courtesy of the Library of CongressThis photo, taken over 40 years after the Supreme Court ruling that established separate-but-equal, is evidence of the law and custom that prevailed after the Plessy v. Ferguson ruling.
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At the bus station in Durham, N.C., photo by Jack Delano, 1940, courtesy of the Library of CongressThis photo, taken over 40 years after the Supreme Court ruling that established separate-but-equal, is evidence of the law and custom that prevailed after the Plessy v. Ferguson ruling.

This Week in Louisiana History

On Sept. 1, 1891, the Citizens’ Committee met to decide how to challenge the Separate Car Act, which stated that people of African descent had to ride in separate rail cars from white people. After failing to pass earlier in the 1890 legislative session, the Separate Car Act was signed into Louisiana law on the last day of the session. Black legislators had voted for the Lottery with the Democrats who supported it. In exchange, they expected that those same Democrats would vote against the Separate Car Act if it came to vote again. There was also some hope … Continue reading →

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History Hiatus

Posted on June 30, 2015 by Molly Manson

Dear Readers, We're pressing pause on "This Week in Louisiana History" for the time being. We hope to bring the feature back at the beginning of the school year. Please, take this opportunity to tell us what you have liked about the feature and what you would like changed. Perhaps you have a topic you would like us to address. Let us hear from you!

Who cares about the seemingly insignificant?

Posted on June 30, 2015 by Molly Manson

The Baton Rouge bus boycott offers several topics for discussion or writing. Here are just a few that come to mind. If you have others, please share them in the comment section below.

Horatio Thompson was a business owner who did what he could to help the boycott effort. He sold gas at cost to those who were using their personal vehicles to give people rides. He is not remembered in the textbooks, but he played a crucial role. Can you find an example of someone who did something that mattered, but who isn't remembered by many people?

The Baton Rouge … Continue reading →